Media

snapd Kingston — December edition

Kingston Whig-Standard – November 22, 2016

Medical practitioners air concerns at Health City

Medical professionals concerned about the state of Ontario’s health-care system made a final push for public input in the controversial Bill 41 Tuesday.

At the Health City fair Tuesday at the Rogers K-Rock Centre, an event that brought medical practitioners from a variety of fields together into one spot, organizers were keen to inform visitors about the concerns about the proposed Patients First Act.

Doctors fear Bill 41 will impact how they deal with their patients and will increase the medical bureaucracy instead of improving frontline care.

Dr. Joy Hataley said in her work on the front lines of the medical system — as a family doctor, emergency department physician and operating room anesthesiologist — she has seen the system struggling.

Read more.

CKWS Television — Novermber 22, 2016

Medical Post — November 18, 2016

Kingston to host one-of-a-kind rally to raise awareness around Ontario’s health-care woes
The creators of Health City say they have never heard of another event like this being held anywhere else in the world

WRITTEN BY TRISTAN BRONCA
NOVEMBER 18, 2016

Kingston, Ont. | There have been several rallies in Ontario recently to draw attention to the impact of different cutbacks and changes in healthcare, but none are quite like the one expected to take place at the K-Rock centre in Kingston on Tuesday, Nov. 22.

Health City was organized by a group of local family physicians and will feature a live band and healthy food vendors. Nurses will be in attendance showing patients how to collect vital signs, and offering short lessons on blood sugars and BMI. There will be 27 information booths, including a full-scale mock operating room where orthopedic surgeons will perform “dry bone” hip replacements, and several others where patients have an opportunity to get generalized health information from other specialists.

But the real driving force behind the event is political.

“We’re trying to engage patients, to give them a voice to speak to government,” said Dr. Joy Hataley, a family doctor and one of the organizers of the event. She said she’s seen nurses run off their feet, and surgeries being cancelled even as patients were being hooked up to the I.V., and patients desperate and frustrated trying to access care.

“You know once you get a patient to care, the care is excellent,” she said. “But the problem is access: it’s not timely, it’s not reliable and it’s not consistent.”

She said the only way she sees the problem being fixed is by redirecting funding to the frontline.

“So we have a number of calls to action at our event,” she said. “Patients can sign petitions if they choose to.” There will also be sign-and-send sample letters addressed to government representatives, guides for writing letters of their own and interactive panel discussions including one on Bill 41—the controversial Patients First legislation.

And yet, Dr. Hataley insists that this event is different than the Concerned Ontario Doctors rallies that have come before. “I think their focus is great, but their focus is different,” she said. “Doctors have been maligned in the province actively for the last two years, and passively before that. Doctors need to stand on their own two feet and defend themselves . . . but we have nothing to do with physician wages or health provider circumstances. We’re speaking to the lack of access, to the tsunami of really complex ill patients that are about to roll up on our shores.”

Where Health City started

Dr. Hataley said Health City was born out of a conversation she had with a social scientist in Kingston.

“I went to him saying I can’t work in this system any longer, it’s too discouraging,” she remembers telling him. He said that the best way to help change it was by engaging the community, and the best way to do that was by throwing a rally.
“I said ‘I don’t know how to have a rally’ and he said ‘just put something in the rally that people are having a hard time getting.’ ”

A few days later, Dr. Hataley decided she would invite a group of hard-to-access specialists to do private consultations up in the private boxes of the K-Rock centre. Patients would bring their family physician referral and sign up for a same-day appointment. But that plan hit a roadblock when she ran it by the college. What if there were more patients than any one physician could see in a day, for instance? What about the setting? Not all doctors could work out of a box outfitted to watch a concert or a hockey game as well as they might be able to work out of the hospital.

And even though that idea got swapped in favour of generalized Q&As, the event continued to pick up steam. They now expect hundreds of people to show up and other tentative events are being planned for next year in Toronto and Ottawa.

The event is free of charge and doors open at 11:00am on Nov. 22.

Station 14 — November 18, 2016


The Huffington Post — November 16, 2016

As many people know, the past two years have seen a significant deterioration in the relationship between Ontario’s physicians, and the Liberal government of Premier Kathleen Wynne and her health minister, Eric Hoskins. While this breakdown in trust was initiated by the government’s decision to impose unilateral cuts to the health-care system, it has been aggravated by the woeful mismanagement of health care by Wynne and Hoskins. The result is that all front line health care workers are experiencing increased stress levels as the system around them fails to meet the needs of Ontario’s growing and aging population.

Many of the situations that have occurred because of Hoskins unilateral cuts were entirely predictable. For example, cutting the fees for addiction services (some by as much as 50 per cent) resulted in the closing of addiction clinics, which then resulted in the government having to back pedal and launch new addiction strategies. That vulnerable patients would be the first to suffer was loudly announced by physicians, and it’s sad that those predictions have come true.

Full article

Media Coverage

Kingston Whig-Standard – November 22, 2016

Medical professionals concerned about the state of Ontario’s health-care system made a final push for public input in the controversial Bill 41 Tuesday.

At the Health City fair Tuesday at the Rogers K-Rock Centre, an event that brought medical practitioners from a variety of fields together into one spot, organizers were keen to inform visitors about the concerns about the proposed Patients First Act.

Doctors fear Bill 41 will impact how they deal with their patients and will increase the medical bureaucracy instead of improving frontline care.

Dr. Joy Hataley said in her work on the front lines of the medical system — as a family doctor, emergency department physician and operating room anesthesiologist — she has seen the system struggling.

“I have done those things for 25 years, and over the last five years I have watched a continual decline in our ability to offer people care on a timely and reliable basis,” Hataley said.

Full article

Kingston Whig-Standard – November 15, 2016

Organizers are hoping a health fair next week will leave local residents better informed about the provincial health-care system as well as inspire them to find ways to improve it.

And if all that isn’t enough, you can also get your flu shot, sample some nutritious food and listen to a country band.

The event, called Health City Kingston, will be held Tuesday, November 22 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Rogers K-Rock Centre. It is hoped it will be the start of a series of similar health fairs across the province.

The idea behind the fair is to both inform and empower, explained Dr. Veronica Legnini, who, with Dr. Joy Hataley, is one of the main organizers. The two are part of a group of health-care professionals and community members who are concerned about the health-care system in the province.

Full article

Press Releases

#1 – November 14, 2016

A group of local citizens, together with leaders in health care delivery, are busy planning a sensational event to provide people in Kingston the opportunity to speak up for meaningful healthcare reform in Ontario.

On November 22nd, thousands of people will gather at the Rogers K-Rock Centre for a free, first of its kind health care event, Health City. Health City will offer the community an opportunity to engage with health education booths, attend question and answer sessions with specialists, and listen to discussions and debates on critical issues facing our health care today. The event will also highlight the controversial Bill 41 – the so called “Patient’s First” Act that is being fast-tracked through legislation without sufficient input from those on the front-line – and ask citizens to voice their opinions on the matter.

Full article

#2 – November 16, 2016

Tomorrow, the Health City Ontario team will gather at Canadian Blood Services to donate blood and actively support the health of people of all ages in the Province and their local community, Kingston.

The team – a coalition of local citizens and health care professionals concerned about health care in Ontario – will meet as
donors at 10:00 a.m. on November 17th, at the Canadian Blood Services Blood Donor Clinic at 850 Gardiners Road.

“This is a way of tangibly demonstrating our commitment to bolstering health care in Ontario,” says Sarah Arrowsmith, a local
family doctor and community advocate. “It’s a measure of how important our community is to each of us and a way of drawing attention to many of the challenges we face in delivering timely and consistent health care.”

Full article

#3 — Raising Voices at Health City Ontario